Take a step into the Lonely Not Alone universe
The Lonely Not Alone universe has been co-designed by young people, for young people, to tackle the stigma of youth loneliness.
21 10 2021
Take a step into the Lonely Not Alone universe

The Lonely Not Alone universe has been co-designed by young people, for young people, to tackle the stigma of youth loneliness. It’s a safe place for young people to share their stories, find their tribe and discover the one small step that could help to make things better.
Take a step into the universe and please share it with any young people you know.

When a young person shares their story it becomes a star in the night sky, and joins other stars in a constellation of young people with similar experiences of loneliness. The universe is home to ten beautiful constellations, each a place for young people to belong. The Hedgehog constellation is full of people who are hurting, but don’t let anyone get near enough to help. Urban Foxes have been moved from place to place and feel like outsiders. Unicorn constellation is made up of talented people who just don’t seem to fit in with those around them.
Each constellation has been mapped to the real night sky, so young people can look up and see their star up there, shining bright. They’ll know that even when they feel lonely, they’re not alone, and although the universe goes on forever, loneliness doesn’t have to.
As time goes by the ten constellations that make up the universe will fill up with more and more stories, so check it out from time to time.

Helen, 21, helped to co-design the campaign, she sums up why it’s so important for young people:
“Loneliness is actually a common and natural human experience. I’ve definitely had times in my life when I’ve been lonely, but it comes and goes. Loneliness doesn’t last forever. It’s really important that we start to normalise talking about loneliness. I hope that through this year’s Lonely Not Alone campaign, young people can learn that other people feel the exact same way they do, and putting it into words, or talking about it can help.”

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