Past workshops organized by CRI Research
Open A.I. Workshop

13-15 November 2019

In this three-day Advanced Workshop, the CRI brough together 15+ leaders in the fields of fundamental and applied AI/ML as well as policy makers to identify and discuss the most timely research directions. Rather than relying on frontal presentations on the state of the art, we harnessed the collective intelligence of the assembled experts to look towards the future. A broad range of topcs emerged from the conversations among the participants, including ones be driven by questions such as: How can we successfully use AI/ML for research on data that is scarce and/or expensive to collect/label (e.g. in physical sciences, where acquiring and tagging millions of data points is unattainable). Can we understand the underlying algorithms: What are the basis for the decisions made? Can we detect and correct possible biases? What impacts AI will have on our society? How can we make sure it will benefit the common good? What are the next frontiers of AI? How can we leverage open and citizen based science approaches to build trust with non-experts and build an informed society?

Participants
  • Carla Gomes (Director of the Institute for Computational Sustainability, Cornell University, USA)
  • Matthieu Komorowski (senior lecturer, Imperial College London, machine learning and critical care in medicine)
  • Hanan Salam (founder "Women in AI", researcher, professor and entrepreneur)
  • Clément Moulin Frier (research scientists, Cogitai Inc., USA)
  • Antoine Cully (research associate, Imperial College London, AI and robotics)
  • Yann Le Cunff (assistant professor, University of Rennes)
  • Françoise Soulié Fogelman (co-founder of Hub France Intelligence Artificielle, member of European Commission AI High Level Experts Group)
  • Hugues Berry (Vice director for “Health, biology and digital”, INRIA, France)
  • Patrick Loiseau (Research Scientist @INRIA - Chair on Explainable and Responsible AI within the MIAI@Grenoble Alpes institute)
  • Jean-Baptiste Masson (Principal Investigator, Institute Pasteur)
  • Laurence Devillers (Professor of , LIMSI-CNRS)
  • Natalia Diaz (Ass. Prof. of Artificial Intelligence, ENSTA ParisTechm, Inria, France)
  • Jill-Jênn Vie (Research Scientists, Inria Lille, France)
  • Michele Sebag (Research Director, Inria & CNRS, France)
  • Alice Othmani (UPEC Paris)
  • Themis Palpanas (Paris Descartes)
Open Health Workshop

10th to 12th of October 2018

We believe one of the most promising opportunities for enabling many more people to escape disease and improve their overall well-being is the Open Health movement. While this movement can mean different things to different people, we see at least the following three features:

  • People have access to data and tools
  • People can meaningfully interact with each other
  • People can build on each other’s learnings

In this workshop, we critically examined the current state-of-art for each feature and identify and explore the key challenges facing the Open Health movement.

Participants
  • Abhishek Pratap – Sage Bionetworks
  • Aida Bafwta – CRI
  • Amodsen Chotia – CRI
  • Anirudh Krishnakumar – CRI
  • Anna McCollister – Slipp Scripps Translational Science Institute
  • Aravind Menon – Imperial College
  • Ariel Lindner – CRI
  • Arno Klein – Child Mind Institute
  • Camille Nebeker – UCSD
  • Dusan Misevic – CRI
  • Felix Schoeller – CRI
  • Francois Taddei – CRI
  • Gabriela Sanchez – University of Geneva
  • Irene Pasquetto – UCLA
  • Jake Wintermute – CRI
  • Jason Bobe – Mount Sinai School of Medicine
  • Joel Chevrier – CRI
  • John Naslund – Harvard Medical School
  • Jon Clucas – Child Mind Institute
  • Jonathan Grizou – Universiyt of Glasgow
  • Karim Sandid – CRI
  • Kathy Hudson – People-Centered Research Foundation
  • Lara Mangravite – Sage Bionetworks
  • Liubov Tupikina – CRI
  • Marc Santolini – CRI
  • Marion Voillot – CRI
  • Matthieu Schapira – University of Toronto
  • Pattie Gonsalves – The Mental Health Innovation Network
  • Philippe Bertrand – CRI
  • Quentin Marcou – CRI
  • Stephanie Lehuger – CRI
  • Stephen Friend – Sage Bionetworks
  • Sweekrity Kanodia – Imperial College
  • Thomas Landrain – Just One Giant Lab
Open Science of Learning Workshop

13-15 June 2018

Participants in this workshop investigated how open science and citizen science can serve learning research and innovation. Participants were invited based on their interest and experience in one or, preferably, both education and open science. As this question is relatively new, the emphasis was be on group discussion, generation of novel research directions and initiatives, and finding points of consensus, rather than on individual lectures. Implementation, scaling up, and policy-making issues, such as convincing administrators and elected officials of the efficacy of new methods, were also part of discussions.

Participants
  • Ariel Lindner – CRI
  • Sylvie Barbier – Art / Earth / Tech Institute​​​
  • Darlene Cavalier – Arizona State University, SciStarter
  • Dusan Misevic – CRI (workshop co-organizer)
  • Eric Klopfer – MIT
  • Félix Schoeller – CRI
  • Franck Zenasni – University Paris Descartes
  • Francois Taddei – CRI
  • Jacob Sherson – Aarhus University, Science at Home
  • Jenna Lahdemaki – Sitra Finland
  • Kobi Gal – Ben-Gurion University, Harvard University
  • Liam Kavanagh – Art / Earth / Tech Institute (workshop co-organizer)
  • Luis P. Prieto – Tallinn University (workshop co-organizer)
  • Marc Santolini – CRI
  • Matthew Berland – University of Wisconsin
  • Pierre Dillenbourg – EPFL, Switzerland
  • Robert Goldstone, University of Indiana
  • Rufus Pollock – Art / Earth / Tech Institute
  • Sophie Touzé – Open Education Consortium; Ministry of Higher Education and Research
  • Taylor Martin – Chief Learning Scientist, O’Reilly
  • Yuval Hart – Harvard University (workshop co-organizer)
Full workshop description

In recent years open science has lowered barriers to the flow of information amongst scientists, from scientists to the public, and most radically, has encouraged public input into scientific process, especially in the natural and health sciences. Education on the other hand, must find ways to meet ever-increasing challenges such as the rapidly-changing needs for learning in the information era, the effective integration of constant developments in information technology and new understandings of the human mind. Principled navigation of the myriad educational possibilities might be facilitated by the practices and culture of open science. However, the intersection of educational research and open science is still a rather underexplored area.

Participants in this workshop investigated how open science and citizen science can serve learning research and innovation. Participants were invited based on their interest and experience in one or, preferably, both education and open science. As this question is relatively new, the emphasis was be on group discussion, generation of novel research directions and initiatives, and finding points of consensus, rather than on individual lectures. Implementation, scaling up, and policy-making issues, such as convincing administrators and elected officials of the efficacy of new methods, were also part of discussions.

During the workshop participants worked on a white paper charting avenues for progress in research and practice of open science in learning. The goal of the white paper was to identify opportunities and outline initiatives that will allow open science and citizen science to help educators and learners in decision-making (e.g., deciding between the large variety of possible educational methods).

The workshop was conducted with an awareness that learning is attended by varied and strong opinions: special care was taken to keep discussions friendly and productive. To drive real change, research in education must be aware of the experiences, innovations, concerns and intuitions of educators, students, and policy makers. This is why open and participatory scientific investigations hold special potential in the realm of education.

Future Paths of Synthetic Biology

5-7 October 2017

The workshop was held at CRI in October 2017, celebrating the 10 years of the Paris Bettencourt team success in the iGEM competition.

The workshop was organized by CRI alumni and students and benefited form the presence of 15 international invited specialists.

The workshop combined short visionary talks, sparking exciting discussions between the participants that were funneled to charting future paths of open synthetic biology.

Participants
  • David Bikard - Institut Pasteur, France
  • Greg Bokinsky - University of Delft, Netherlands
  • Nadine Bongaerts - CRI
  • Jerome Bonnet - Centre de Biochimie Structurale of Montpellier, France
  • Alicia Calvo-Villamanan - Institut Pasteur, France
  • Guillaume Cambray - INRA, France
  • Urszula Czerwinska - Institut Curie
  • Tom Ellis - Imperial College London, UK
  • Drew Endy - Stanford University, USA
  • Sophie Gontier - CRI (co-organizer)
  • Haotian Guo - CRI
  • Karmella Haynes -Arizona State University, USA
  • Pascal Hersen - CNRS, France
  • David Kong - MIT, USA
  • Nicolas Krink - Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Germany (co-organizer)
  • Ariel Lindner - CRI (co-organizer)
  • Meagan Lizarazo - iGEM Foundation
  • Anne Löchner - Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Germany (co-organizer)
  • Dusan Misevic - CRI (co-organizer)
  • Megan Palmer - Stanford University
  • Randy Rettberg - iGEM Foundation
  • Jake Wintermute - CRI
Shaping our Major Transition

28-30 June 2017

The first CRI Research Advanced Workshop bridged foundational research and societal impact, specifically focusing on tracing past major transitions and understanding and shaping current digital transition. During two intense days, the eclectic mix of eminent thinkers who converged at CRI and worked on identifying the challenges posed by the current digital transition of society, and charting the way forward. The workshop participants collectively identified the most promising and exciting research topics for the near future, which can be grouped in the following four research foci: (1) major digital transition (2) designing governance (3) theory of governance (4) governance systems for learning

Participants
  • Andrew Black – University of Adelaide
  • Asa Calow – Manchester Digital Laboratory
  • Olivier Crouzet – 42
  • Vincent Danos – ENS
  • Simon DeDeo – Santa Fe Institute
  • Seth Frey – Dartmouth College
  • Francois Fages – INRIA
  • Sandra González-Bailón – University of Pennsylvania
  • Gillian Hadfield – University of Southern California
  • Martin Hilbert – University of California Davis (workshop co-organizer)
  • Dusan Misevic – CRI (workshop co-organizer)
  • Grace Neville – University of Cork
  • Cadell Last – Vrije University
  • Ariel Lindner – CRI
  • Rob Lue – Harvard University
  • Laurent Keller – University of Lausanne
  • Stefan Klauser – ETH Zurich
  • Thomas Pfeiffer – Massey University
  • Paul Rainey – ESPCIParisTech, Massey University
  • Francois Taddei – CRI (workshop co-organizer)